Shortcuts

Connect with us on Facebook!
Subscribe.
[Feeds & Readers]
Follow us on Twitter!

Make us your home page!
Authors, sign in!

Recommend Our Site!

You can use this handy tool to send emails to people you'd like to recommend this site to. We assure you that their email addresses will never be shared or even stored. Your privacy is 100% protected.

Just fill in the blanks and send your email! It's easy.

Their names here:
Their email:
Your name:

Main

Front Page » Table of Contents » Archive: Books & Book Reviews: November 2007

By an everyday book reader on November 1, 2007

An impassioned call to action to Americans from all walks of life to restore the checks and balances and our time-honored protections against abuses of power outlined by our Founding Fathers. Our country's founders believed that the proper goal of the State was to make men and women free to develop their faculties and to pursue virtue and wisdom. Our Constitution was built around these principles, protecting civil liberties and developing a careful system of checks and balances which protected our freedom from tyranny.

Naomi Wolf's latest work, The End of America: A Letter of Warning to a Young Patriot exposes how the escalation of Executive Power has eroded these core values and systems, limiting our Congress to make laws, and our courts to interpret them - a scenario that our Founding Fathers foresaw and warned against. Wolf outlines in this citizen call to action, reminiscent of Thomas Paine's revered Common Sense, the real threats that exist to our civil liberties and explains how working together we can solve the growing threat.

Read more of this post here ...

By an everyday book reader on November 1, 2007

This wholly original new work by the best-selling author of The Great Unraveling challenges America to reclaim the values that made it great.

With this major new volume, Paul Krugman, "the heir apparent to Galbraith" (Alan Blinder) and, today's most widely read economist, studies the past eighty years of American history, from the reforms that tamed the harsh inequality of the Gilded Age to the unraveling of that achievement and the reemergence of immense economic and political inequality since the 1970s.

Seeking to understand both what happened to middle-class America and what it will take to achieve a "new New Deal," Krugman has created his finest book to date, a work that weaves together a nuanced account of three generations of history with sharp political, social, and economic analysis.

This book, written with Krugman's trademark ability to explain complex issues simply, will transform the debate about American social policy in much the same way as did John Kenneth Galbraith's deeply influential book The Affluent Society.

Read more of this post here ...

By an everyday book reader on November 1, 2007

In a series of focus groups in 2005 and 2006, EPI asked middle-class Americans to discuss their economic insecurities. The discussions revealed not only a profound ambivalence about the economy, but also a widening gap between the ways that everyday Americans and influential elites talk about the economy. Co-authored by David Kusnet, Lawrence Mishel, and Ruy Teixeira, this book discusses that gap and how to bridge it, allowing for changing economic, social, and political conditions. The study includes a special section that offers 12 suggestions for how to 'speak American' when talking about economics.

Read more of this post here ...

By an everyday book reader on November 1, 2007

"At a time when the tide runs toward a sure conformity, when dissent is often confused with subversion, when a man's belief may be subject to investigation as well as his actions..." (Studs Terkel)

Those words of Terkel have the ring of a modern day mayday call of distress, yet they were written in 1952. Ed Murrow, introducing an assemblage of voices in 2006 in the volume This I Believe, sounded a claxon. It is an old story yet ever-contemporary. In 1791, Tom Paine, the most eloquent visionary of the American Revolution, sounded off:

Freedom has been hunted around the globe; reason was considered as rebellion; and the slavery of fear made man afraid to think. But such is the irresistible nature of truth is that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing... In such a situation, man becomes what he ought to be. He sees his species not with the inhuman idea of a natural enemy, but as kindred... (Thomas Paine)

It is the pursuit of this truth that appears to be the common tenor of all the voices you hear in this book. Albert Einstein once observed that westerners have a feeling the individual loses his freedom if he joins, say, a union or any group. Precisely the opposite is the case. Once you join others, even though at first your mission fails, you become a different person, a much stronger one. You feel that you really count, you discover your strength as an individual because you have along the way discovered others share in what you believe, you are not alone; and thus a community is formed.

Read more of this post here ...

By an everyday book reader on November 1, 2007

Americans face prodigious economic and social challenges today, yet nothing unifies the various strategies and causes that attempt to meet these challenges.

Economist Jared Bernstein believes that frames such as "the ownership society" stress an ever-shrinking role for government and an ever-increasing risk for individuals, clearly implying: "You're on your own."

Arguing that this shift toward extreme individualism needlessly reduces the country's economic security and the living standards of most families, he describes the political and economic forces that pushed the country away from collective action and exposes the significant societal costs associated with the shift.

Read more of this post here ...

By an everyday book reader on November 1, 2007

Here, from Bill Clinton, is a call to action. Giving is an inspiring look at how each of us can change the world. First, it reveals the extraordinary and innovative efforts now being made by companies and organizations - and by individuals - to solve problems and save lives both "down the street and around the world." Then it urges us to seek out what each of us, "regardless of income, available time, age, and skills," can do to help, to give people a chance to live out their dreams.

Read more of this post here ...

Want to read more in this same topic?

We have more! This page only lists entries in a particular month. It's likely that we have many more blog posts under this same category in other months too. Most of the posts that our authors publish are timeless and relevant, regardless of when the articles are posted. We encourage and welcome you to look back through our archives in this same category.

The previous archive is Books & Book Reviews: October 2007.

The next archive is Books & Book Reviews: January 2008.


Our sponsors help us stay online to serve you. Thank you for doing your part! By using the specific links below to start any of your online shopping, you are making a tremendous difference. By using the links below, you are directly helping to support this community website:

If you want to browse other topics, you can also check our Table of Contents. The most current posts can always be found on our Front Page.


Browse the Blogs!

You are Here!

This is a category archive page containing all of the entries posted to Everyday Citizen in one particular category in one particular month.

The entries on this page fall under the heading of Books & Book Reviews: November 2007.

To read more in this topic, just go back to the main category page by choosing it from the Table of Contents.

The previous archive is Books & Book Reviews: October 2007.

The next archive is Books & Book Reviews: January 2008.

If you'd like to see more entries in this same category, for a different month or year, we have more!

The most current posts can always be found on our Front Page.

Books You Might Like!

Notices & Policies

All of the Everyday Citizen authors are delighted you are here. We all hope that you come back often, leave us comments, and become an active part of our community. Welcome!

All of our contributing authors are credentialed by invitation only from the editor/publisher of EverydayCitizen.com. If you are visiting and are interested in writing here, please feel free to let us know.

For complete site policies, including privacy, see our Frequently Asked Questions. This site is designed, maintained, and owned by its publisher, Everyday Citizen Media. EverydayCitizen.com, The Everyday Citizen, everydaycitizens.com, and Everyday Citizen are trademarked names.

Each of the authors here retain their own copyrights for their original written works, original photographs and art works. Our authors also welcome and encourage readers to copy, reference or quote from the content of their blog postings, provided that the content reprints include obvious author or website attribution and/or links to their original postings, in accordance with this website's Creative Commons License.

© Copyright, 2007-2011, All rights reserved, unless otherwise specified, first by each the respective authors of each of their own individual blogs and works, and then by the editor and publisher for any otherwise unreserved and all other content. Our editor primarily reviews blogs for spelling, grammar, punctuation and formatting and is not liable or responsible for the opinions expressed by individual authors. The opinions and accuracy of information in the individual blog posts on this site are the sole responsibility of each of the individual authors.