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Front Page » Table of Contents » Archive: Books & Book Reviews: March 2007

By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

"It is easy to shock and awe with bombs. It takes talent to shock and awe with words. These poets are the shock troops of the peace movement, piercing our conscience with the ferocity of their passion, their pain, their insights, their dreams. Breathe deeply, read slowly and savor their words." - Medea Benjamin, co-founder of Code Pink and Global Exchange

An urgent dispatch straight from the real Washington, D.C. Poets Against the War features 59 Washington-area poets, ages 10 to 80, who raise their voices against their government's war on Iraq.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Collected here in one volume are fifteen cutting-edge essays by leading academics which together clarify and defend the claim that freedom from poverty is a human right with corresponding binding obligations on the more affluent to practice effective poverty avoidance.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Today's world is in desperate need of realistic alternatives to violent conflict. Nonviolent action - properly planned and executed - is a powerful and effective force for political and social change. In his most recent work, Dr. Sharp shows how to strategically plan nonviolent struggle and make it more effective.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

"What you've got to understand is that nobody ever asks us what we think."
Veteran reporter Melinda Henneberger set out across the country to listen to women of all ages and occupations express their strong opinions on the major issues of our time. Over eighteen months she spoke in depth and at length with more than two hundred women in twenty states, from Massachusetts to Arizona and Oregon to Texas.

She discovered how unheard women feel, how ignored and disregarded by both major parties and by most politicians.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

President Bush declared a "war on terrorism" and 90 percent of the American people believed he was doing the right thing.

But is there another way? From Buddha in the pre-Christian era to the most recent declaration of peace principles by Nobel laureates, nonviolence has always been an alternative.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Was the Boston Tea Party the first WTO-style protest against transnational corporations? Did Supreme Court sell out America's citizens in the nineteenth century, with consequences lasting to this day? Is there a way for American citizens to recover democracy of, by, and for the people?

Thom Hartmann takes on these most difficult questions and tells a startling story that will forever change your understanding of American history. He begins by uncovering an original eyewitness account of the Boston Tea Party and demonstrates that it was provoked not by "taxation without representation" as is commonly suggested but by the specific actions of the East India Company, which represented the commericial interests of the British elite.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

The Farm Bill is perhaps the single most significant land use legislation enacted in the United States, yet many citizens remain unaware of its power and scope.

With subsidies ballooning toward $25 billion dollars per year, the Farm Bill largely dictates who grows what crops, on what acreage, and under what conditions - all with major impacts on the country's rural economies, health and nutrition, national security, and biodiversity.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

In Strength for the Journey, Diana Butler Bass illustrates the dynamic strength and persistence of mainline Protestantism. While many baby boomers left the church, only to come back later in life, Bass was a "stayer" who witnessed the struggles and changes and found much there that was meaningful.

"Bass delivers the ostensible goods - an account of her life in eight different Episcopal churches - and even if the book stopped there, it would be magnificent." - Publishers Weekly

Offering thought-provoking portraits of eight parishes she attended over two decades, she explores the major issues that have confronted mainline denominations, congregations, and parishioners during those years - from debates over women clergy to conflicts about diversity and community to scrimmages between tradition and innovation.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

"You will never think about 'free trade' the same way after reading Jeff Faux's superb book. As Faux makes clear, the globalization debate is really about whose interests are served by global elites, and how we need to go about reclaiming a democracy that serves ordinary people. This book should transform public discourse in America." - Robert Kuttner, founding coeditor of the American Prospect and a contributing columnist to Business Week

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

The Activist's Handbook is a hard-hitting guide to making social change happen. Shaw, a longtime activist for urban issues, shows how positive change can still be accomplished - despite an increasingly grim political order - if activists employ the strategies set forth in this desperately needed primer.

This book also offers a sophisticated analysis of the American power structure by someone on the front lines. In showing how people can and must make a difference at both local and national levels, this is an indispensable guide not only for activists, but for everyone interested in the future of progressive politics in America.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Ten years after its original publication, The Great Good Place is touching more people than ever before. The owners of Seattle's Third Place Books, which opened in 1998, were directly inspired by this book, as are, increasingly, entrepreneurs and planners nationwide.

They are fueled by its compelling central thesis: that "third places," where people can gather, put aside the concerns of the work and home, and hang out simply for the pleasures of good company and lively conversation, are the heart of a community's social vitality and the grassroots of democracy.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

In this groundbreaking book, veteran science correspondent Fred Pearce travels to more than thirty countries to examine the current state of crucial water sources.

Deftly weaving together the complicated scientific, economic, and historic dimensions of the world water crisis, he provides our most complete portrait yet of this growing danger and its ramifications for us all.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Thom Hartmann, the acclaimed author of Unequal Protection and The Last Hours of Ancient Sunlight, tells a compelling story in this book -- of how a government of, by, and for the people has been replaced by corporate domination.

Through brilliant analysis and imaginative illustrations, this fully graphic book illuminates the central dynamics of American politics. There is still time to halt the loss and restore many of our precious rights and freedoms. Hartmann points the way out of the peril -- in brilliant, down-to-earth fashion.

Most importantly, the book issues a call to action from citizens who want to restore true democracy, and liberty and justice for all.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Expanding her three-part New Yorker series, journalist Elizabeth Kolbert examines the immediate and far-reaching consequences of global warming, drawing on history and cutting-edge science and discussing the contentious political debate surrounding the issue.

Anyone familiar with Kolbert's work knows how thoughtful and engagingly accessible her writing is. In this blend of hard science, impeccable research, and superb storytelling, she advances her arguments in powerful, persuasive prose -- leading us to the inescapable conclusion that we will pay dearly, even fatally, if we do not take drastic measures now to save our planet from this imminent, pervasive threat.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Music industry insider and progressive activist Danny Goldberg has spent decades tuning in to the rhythms and voices that speak straight to the hearts and desires of America's youth. In that time, one fact has become increasingly clear: our venerable political leaders are tone deaf.

In this startling, provocative book, Goldberg shows how today's professional public servants have managed to achieve nothing less than the indefensible, wholesale alienation of an entire generation. Elvis has left the building -- and he's taken just about everybody under thirty with him.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

The truth about the climate crisis is an inconvenient one that means we are going to have to change the way we live our lives.

Al Gore's groundbreaking book, An Inconvenient Truth, brings together leading-edge research from top scientists around the world, as well as photographs, charts, and other illustrations to document the reality of global warming - and to sound a warning bell for action before it's too late.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

The Working Poor examines the "forgotten America" where "millions live in the shadow of prosperity, in the twilight between poverty and well-being." These are citizens for whom the American Dream is out of reach despite their willingness to work hard. Struggling to simply survive, they live so close to the edge of poverty that a minor obstacle, such as a car breakdown or a temporary illness, can lead to a downward financial spiral that can prove impossible to reverse.

David Shipler interviewed many such working people for this book and his profiles offer an intimate look at what it is like to be trapped in a cycle of dead-end jobs without benefits or opportunities for advancement. He shows how some proudly refuse any sort of government assistance, even to their detriment. Still others have no idea that help is available at all.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Social class remains a powerful force in North American life, its effects more pronounced than most of us realize. From health to religious practice to college education to consumer goods, the differences that distinguish the top from the middle from the bottom remain stark, even as social mobility seems to have stagnated. A team of New York Times reporters has spent more than a year exploring the ways in which class defined as a combination of income, education, wealth, and occupation influences destiny in a society that likes to think of itself as a land of unbounded opportunity.

This book takes us on a tour of what they found and what it means for the future.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

In 1982, Washington Post columnist Colman McCarthy was invited to teach a course on writing at an impoverished public school in Washington D.C.

He responded, "I'd rather teach peace." Since then, he has had more than 5,000 students in his classes on nonviolence, pacifism, and conflict management.

I'd Rather Teach Peace is the story of one man's passion for peace education, as seen during one semester in six schools where risk-taking students found themselves challenged and inspired by an unconventional course and by a man who believes that if we don't teach our children peace someone else will teach them violence.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

This fine book by former secretary of state Madeleine Albright is a thoughtful and finely reasoned reflection on the role of religion in world politics.

Writing in a plainspoken style that belies her erudition, Albright ranges over history and current events to show how America has underestimated or ignored the importance of faith in the cultures of other countries. She presents an eloquent plea for seeking out common ground, arguing that in today's world politics and religion must be partnered effectively in order to achieve justice, peace, and understanding. Infused with lively anecdotes and perceptive observations, this is one foreign policy primer we think merits particular attention.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

With America Back on Track, Senator Edward Kennedy reveals a critical plan to revive the lapsed values of our nation.

With a Senate career that has spanned more than four decades, Edward Kennedy has become one of the strongest voices in American politics. In this book, he argues that America is at a crossroads, having reached a point where it has departed more deeply from its fundamental ideals than at any time in its modern history. In response to the erosion of the nation's basic values, he presents a sweeping agenda for reform and renewal, speaking to the country's most significant needs at home and abroad.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Be the Change celebrates the personal transformations of men and women who, by working to change the world, changed themselves. Featuring interviews with over 1,000 volunteers, from everyday people to business and community leaders to celebrities, the book combines hands-on advice on ways to get involved with enlightening real-life stories from those who did.

Inspirational yet practical, it's the perfect companion for readers who want to stop daydreaming about a more fulfilling life and a better world and take action to do so.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Pundits and social observers have voiced alarm each year as fewer Americans involve themselves in voluntary groups that meet regularly. Thousands of nonprofit groups have been launched in recent times, but most are run by professionals who lobby Congress or deliver social services to clients.

What will happen to U.S. democracy if participatory groups and social movements wither, while civic involvement becomes one more occupation rather than every citizen's right and duty?

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Used wisely, America's immense military power can preserve freedom but used unwisely, it can fracture global stability. Stefan Halper and Jonathan Clarke argue, that as long as neo-conservative radicals dominate the nation's national security process, fracture is more likely.

Assuming our nation will see increasing threats in the future, this book is important because it identifies the factions and agendas involved.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Citizen activism has achieved many positive results. But the road to success for social movements is often complex, usually lasting many years, with few guides for evaluating the precise stage of a movement's evolution to determine the best way forward.

This book is both a strategic orientation to, and a tactical primer on, how to develop and manage non-violent social movements at the grassroots or "people power" level.

Read more of this post here ...

By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

Are you looking for a more meaningful travel experience? Do you want to give back to the communities you visit, make a genuine connection with locals, meet like-minded travelers and build your skills?

This book is edited and written by passionate, well-traveled Lonely Planet authors who also have acquired advice from experts in the field of global volunteerism. Much more than just a resource directory, Volunteer is packed with valuable information and full-color inspiration to get your planning your perfect short- or long-term volunteer experience anywhere in the world--whether it's monitoring sea turtles in Greece, helping set up handicraft businesses in Ghana or building community centers in Guatemala!

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

The fear and exhilaration of heading into battle;
The relief and reward in knowing you are both serving and surviving;
The guilt and remorse for what you did do, didn't do, or couldn't know;
The physical and emotional toll it takes from you;
The somber and aching memories for those returning in flag draped caskets;
The horror, that you never knew existed;
The horror, that you're not sure if you can ever discuss with anyone;
The horror that sits at the front of your mind at all times.

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By an everyday book reader on March 1, 2007

This provocative culmination of Barber's lifelong study of democracy and capitalism shows how the infantilist ethos deprives society of responsible citizens and displaces public goods with private commodities. Traditional liberal democratic society is colonized by an all-pervasive market imperative. Public space is privatized. Identity is branded. Our world, homogenized.

With brilliance and depth, Barber confronts the likely consequences for our children, our liberty, and our citizenship, and shows finally how citizens can resist and transcend the civic schizophrenia with which consumerism has infected them.

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We have more! This page only lists entries in a particular month. It's likely that we have many more blog posts under this same category in other months too. Most of the posts that our authors publish are timeless and relevant, regardless of when the articles are posted. We encourage and welcome you to look back through our archives in this same category.

The next archive is Books & Book Reviews: April 2007.


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The entries on this page fall under the heading of Books & Book Reviews: March 2007.

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The next archive is Books & Book Reviews: April 2007.

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