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« September 2016 | Main | November 2016 »

Front Page » Monthly Archives » October 2016

By Angelo Lopez on October 30, 2016


I support Hillary for President. Of the two candidates who are running, Hillary's proposals on a variety of issues comes the closest to my political views. I'm a liberal and Hillary is basically a centrist, so we won't agree on everything. But I believe she has the toughness and the right skill set to deal with a Republican House of Representatives, right wing attacks, and the racial divisions that were exposed in this election cycle.

Read more from this post here ...

By Angelo Lopez on October 22, 2016

Yesterday morning I read news that Philippine President Duterte wants to cut economic and military ties to the U.S. and to strengthen ties with China and Russia. This adds to the worries that I have about President Duterte. I'm not against Duterte's efforts to open up markets for Philippine business and agriculture in China and Russia. Duterte just recently finished a trip to China where $24 billion worth of trade deals were agreed to between China and the Philippines, which is a good accomplishment.

Countries like Vietnam and Japan, however, have pursued greater economic trade with China and Russia while also pursuing trade with the United States. About 43% of Overseas Filipino Worker remittances comes from the United States. Trade between the Philippines and the United States total $16.491 billion. When Duterte says that the Philippines has to cut ties to the U.S. in order to pursue greater trade with China and Russia, it's a false choice that other countries don't have to make.

Here is an excerpt of an article by Paterno Esmaquel II for Rappler:

Trade between Manila and Washington amounts to $16.491 billion favoring the Philippines, according to a fact sheet provided by the DFA in September.

The US also continues to host 5,997,330 Filipinos as Duterte vows to cut military and economic ties with Washington...

...Duterte's economic planners, however, sought to clarify the President's statement.
"We will maintain relations with the West but we desire stronger integration with our neighbors," Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III and Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Ernesto Pernia said in a statement after Duterte's speech...

...Former Philippine foreign secretary Albert del Rosario earlier called on the Duterte administration to count the economic cost of the country's shift in foreign policy.

"In foreign affairs, you try to get as many friends as possible. You don't get one friend at the expense of another friend," he explained. "Playing a zero-sum game is illogical and we should get away from this."

Read more from this post here ...

By Angelo Lopez on October 22, 2016

For the past week I've been recovering from watching the last Presidential debate. The tenor of the entire presidential campaign has me worried about the great divisions in this country and how it'll affect the health of the democratic republic. Then I was caught by surprise to see a video of Trump and Hillary together at a dinner laughing and making bad jokes. I had never heard of the Al Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner until a day or two ago, but I went on wikipedia to learn more about it. The Al Smith Memorial Foundation was founded by Francis Cardinal Spellman in 1946, to honor the memory of Alfred Emanuel Smith, New York's renowned Governor and patron of the "Little People". The Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation serves neediest children of the Archdiocese of New York, regardless of race, creed, or color.

According to wikipedia:

The first dinner was in 1945, the year after Al Smith's death. It is generally the last event at which the two U.S. presidential candidates share a stage before the election. Apart from presidential candidates, keynote speakers have included Clare Boothe Luce, Bob Hope, Henry Kissinger, Tom Brokaw, Tony Blair, and many other prominent figures in government, business, the media, and entertainment.

Since 1960 (when Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy were speakers), it has been a stop for the two main presidential candidates during several U.S. election years. In 1976, Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter spoke; in 1980, Carter and Ronald Reagan; in 1988, Michael Dukakis and George H.W. Bush; in 2000, Al Gore and George W. Bush; in 2008, John McCain and Barack Obama; in 2012, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney and in 2016, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Since 1945, only two presidents have not spoken at the dinner: Harry Truman and Bill Clinton. Candidates have traditionally given humorous speeches poking fun at themselves and their opponents, making the event similar to a roast. The 2008 dinner raised $3.9 million.

Read more from this post here ...

By Angelo Lopez on October 15, 2016

When I watched the second Presidential debate, I couldn't believe the depths that Trump went to in attacking Hillary Clinton. Trump has based his entire presidential campaign focused on personal attacks with little policy specifics.

I think civility is an important component in the political discourse of this country. In a democratic republic, one of the challenges is to get people of different opinions and outlooks to get involved in the political process to find common ground and decide on political decisions. Dan Glickman wrote a wonderful post for the Huffington Post titled Civility No More: Where Are the Better Angels In Politics?. He wrote:

In 1860 as this nation stood on the brink of civil war, President Abraham Lincoln implored Americans and their political leaders to think of, “the better angels of our nature,” before committing totally to the dissolution of the Union.

To plea for civility during one of the most bitter and divisive periods of American history was an attempt to call on a cultural tenet of respect for those with whom you disagree. The value of civility was a necessary component of our culture at our founding because we are a union of different states, then led by people with different ideas of how a federal state should look, but all committed to the idea of the freedom of belief and expression. Such an entity created by people holding divergent views cannot exist without basic elements of civility and respect for your fellow politicians and citizens. We learned early on to disagree agreeably.

Today, things are different. We have witnessed a substantial erosion of civility in political discourse in contemporary politics. In my view, the end of civility in our political system is a true loss for every American, Republican and Democrat alike...

...The state of contemporary politics is one in which bombast is met with approval. Extreme viewpoints are greeted with appreciative nods by a disturbingly large segment of the American electorate, and so the incentive for political leaders to make such comments is significant. Of course, there have always been and will always be people in a free and democratic country such as this who hold views that are extreme or unpopular, and it is their right to do so. But in this country politicians weren’t always so easily able to accrue benefit from being egomaniacal, indecent, uncivil and frankly just plain rude.

Read more from this post here ...

By Angelo Lopez on October 9, 2016

Much has been made in the media about the white working class who make up the majority of Donald Trump's electoral support. Trump has appealed to the fears of this group of Americans by stoking xenophobia, islamophobia and the worst forms of misogyny. This greatly worries me, as I see the divisions growing in the U.S. over race and class. Yet I have some hope as well. Watching the Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton campaigns during the primaries, both are tapping into a tradition of liberal Democrats who reached out to both working class whites and minority communities to build bridges between the two communities and bring Americans together.

The eight hour work day, the forty hour work week, the minimum wage, Social Security, work safety standards, child labor laws, collective bargaining rights, and a whole host of laws protecting worker rights were championed in mainstream politics in the early twentieth century by progressive Republicans like Teddy Roosevelt and Robert LaFollette, and later in the twentieth century by liberal Democrats like Franklin Roosevelt, Hubert Humphrey, the Kennedys, Jesse Jackson and Paul Wellstone.

These progressives saw that the government has an important role to play in helping its most vulnerable citizens weather the worst effects of a free market economy. I'm hoping that Hillary can look to these early examples to bring Americans together.

The Nation magazine has several articles about ways in which progressives can reach out to the white working class who are now supporting Donald Trump.

Read more from this post here ...

Earlier posts in this month:


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