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« August 2016 | Main | October 2016 »

Front Page » Monthly Archives » September 2016

By Angelo Lopez on September 30, 2016

Ever since I followed the trailer reactions to the Batman Vs. Superman movie, I've been hooked on watching the trailer reactions of the movies I look forward to seeing. It's fun following various people give their opinions and to see their reactions to the trailers. Many of them are comic book nerds or movie nerds like me. One movie that I really look forward to seeing is director Patty Jenkins 2017 movie Wonder Woman, starring Gal Gadot.

Wonder Woman was created in 1941 by Dr. William Moulton Marston, a psychologist with a Ph.D. from Harvard, with a specific feminist agenda in mind. Jill Lepore wrote the book The Secret History of Wonder Woman that explores the influences of the woman's suffragist movement and Margaret Sanger's birth control movement on how Marston conceived of the Wonder Woman comic book. Lepore wrote in the New Yorker magazine:

Superman débuted in 1938, Batman in 1939, Wonder Woman in 1941. She was created by William Moulton Marston, a psychologist with a Ph.D. from Harvard. A press release explained, “ ‘Wonder Woman’ was conceived by Dr. Marston to set up a standard among children and young people of strong, free, courageous womanhood; to combat the idea that women are inferior to men, and to inspire girls to self-confidence and achievement in athletics, occupations and professions monopolized by men” because “the only hope for civilization is the greater freedom, development and equality of women in all fields of human activity.” Marston put it this way: “Frankly, Wonder Woman is psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who should, I believe, rule the world.”

Read more from this post here ...

By Angelo Lopez on September 30, 2016



Last Monday I went to a public viewing of the first Presidential debate hosted by CAIR-SFBA, a group that fights for the civil right of the Muslim American community. Since the viewing was only 10 minutes from my home, I decided to go.

I had a nice time meeting everyone and talking about the two candidates. The people who attended were very nice, and they were very welcoming. They served pizza, cookies and soft drinks, which were my dinner.

Needless to say, the crowd was not a Trump crowd. But there were a few individuals who voiced their ambivalence towards Hillary too.

Read more from this post here ...

By Angelo Lopez on September 9, 2016

During this election season, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has made many provocative statements about illegal immigrants, Muslims, Mexicans, women and other minorities. In the presidential debates in the Republican primaries, Trump dragged down the tone of the whole debates by using personal insults rather than talk about the specifics of issues. The Founding Fathers had hoped that the United States would be an enlightened republic where issues could be debated in a civil and serious manner by a well informed electorate. Trump has upended that hope. Many people worry that Trump's rhetoric would have a depressing effect on the electorate by exacerbating the divisions in our society and tearing at our social fabric.

We can see this by how Trump has sown divisions within the Republican Party. Several prominent Republicans will not vote for Trump, like George H.W. Bush, George Bush, Colin Powell, John Kasich, Ted Cruz, Mitt Romney, George Will, David Brooks, Jeb Bush, Lindsey Graham, Sally Bradshaw, Susan Collins, Brent Skowcroft, George Schultz, Paul Wolfowitz, Max Boot, and Meg Whitman. Mitt Romney voiced his concern that many Americans share that Trump would inspire trickle down racism in American society. Romney said in an interview with Wolf Blitzer:

I don't want to see trickle-down racism. I don't want to see a president of the United States saying things which change the character of the generations of Americans that are following. Presidents have an impact on the nature of our nation, and trickle-down racism, trickle-down bigotry, trickle-down misogyny, all these things are extraordinarily dangerous to the heart and character of America.

Read more from this post here ...

By Angelo Lopez on September 4, 2016

Recently San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernik was in the news for his refusal to stand during the national anthem to protest the unjustified killings of young African Americans by police in the past few years. Kaepernik explained that he is not against all police officers, but that rogue police are making things more dangerous for both the African American community and for the good police officers who have tried to do their jobs the right way. If you look at American history in the twentieth century, certain athletes have used their fame as platforms in the fight for social justice. A few names that come to mind are Jackie Robinson, Billie Jean King, John Carlos, Tommie Smith, Muhammad Ali, Bill Russell, Jim Brown, Bill Walton, and Arthur Ashe. These athletes made significant contributions to the civil rights movement, the feminist movement, the anti-war movement and the LGBT rights movement.

Read more from this post here ...

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